KEVIN PAZIK
Kevin Pazik is a MArch Candidate at Princeton University. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Architecture from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and has collaborated with Young & Ayata, Attention Audio Journal, Bureau Spectacular, UrbanLab, The Department of Urban Speculation, and Fresh Meat.

contact: hello[at]kevinpazik.com

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MESSY MATERIAL MACHINES
Messy Material Machines sits somewhere between an interface and a medium. It seeks to break out of the current paradigm of architectural design, which relies heavily on the representation of a material-less digital object in the physical world. If the current architectural paradigm thinks of form as a primarily conceptual generation, thought of in isolation from the messy world of matter and energy, which is given physical form by simply imposing it on a material. In this case, materials are understood as dumb, simple, obedient, receptacles of form. An opposite stance would attest that materials are not inert receptacles for a cerebral form, imposed from outside the system, but active participants in the genesis of form. Implying a heterogeneity of materials, that contain variable properties, behaviors, and idiosyncrasies. By in large, tools deployed in today’s practice leave the inherent morphological and performative capacities of the employed material largely unconsidered. Ways of materializing, producing, and constructing are strategized only after a form has been created, leading to top-down engineered material solutions with ill logics. Messy Material Machines focuses on utilizing and exploiting a material’s behavior rather than merely focusing on its texture, shape, or social status.

Messy Material Machines

GRAINULAR DEPOSITORGRAINULAR DEPOSITOR
FLUID DEPOSITOR2FLUID DEPOSITOR
POWDER DEPOSITORPOWDER DEPOSITOR
LANDSCAPE GROOMERLANDSCAPE GROOMER


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BAUHAUS MUSEUM-DESSAU
In collaboration with Young & Ayata

Team: Michael Young, Kutan Ayata, Sina Özbudun, Isidoro Michan, Aree Rho, Rajika Maheshwari, Kevin Pazik, Tyler Kvochick, Ryan Roark.

Consultants: Misako Murata (Landscape), Florian Gauss/Teuffel Engineering Consultants (Structure), Ben Shepherd/Atelier Ten (Environmental).

It would be a reduction of the complexity of the Bauhaus to divide it cleanly into a technical side and an expressive side, yet technical and expressive factors were often in conflict and in conversation throughout its history. The tension between these two motivations-- and specifically the shape that tension took at the Bauhaus-- continues to influence art, architecture, and design today. Our design of a museum for the Bauhaus Dessau is strongly informed by such productive tension--in this case, the tension between a desire for a modular repeatable system of organization, provided by a grid, and the exploration of sensation found in color and material experimentation.

Our proposal for the Bauhaus Museum Dessau acknowledges these tensions through the design of a building as a collection of individual masses aggregated serially through a grid. We are calling these objects “vessels” as they allude to the crafted object of a vase or volumetric container. The vessels hover above the site on trunk-like legs, creating a light touch in the park and allowing passage underneath. The bellies of the vessels swell to touch each other creating an open continuous floor plan that connects the entire museum with a single floor. These combinations allow the building to fluctuate character between a huddle of singular objects, a sinuous coil of continuity, and a matrix of gridded repetition. Each attitude is at odds with the others, a productive tension resonating through the design.

Project Text & Images Courtesy of Young & Ayata

// One of two first-prize winning entries for the new Bauhaus Museum in Dessau.

Aerial View

Bauhaus Museum - DessauGround Floor
Bauhaus Museum - DessauFirst Floor
Bauhaus Museum - DessauElevation
Bauhaus Museum - DessauSection A
Bauhaus Museum - DessauSection B
Bauhaus Museum - DessauSection C
Bauhaus Museum - DessauView from the corner of Kavalierstraße and Friedrichstraße facing southwest.
Bauhaus Museum - DessauView from City Park
Bauhaus Museum - DessauView from Ratsgasse facing West
Bauhaus Museum - DessauView of Courtyard

Bauhaus Museum - DessauEntry Foyer
Bauhaus Museum - DessauPermanent Gallery
Bauhaus Museum - DessauTemporary Gallery
Bauhaus Museum - DessauCafeteria
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GOOPY GOOP GOOP: A MIESINTERPRETATION
In collaboration with Joanna Grant
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MISAGREEMENTS
Misagreements is a project about agreeing to disagree, a visual contradiction between plan and elevation, between corner and edge, between pattern and color. The elevation is flat; a fat rectangle, three parts, three colors, some windows, a single building. This is false. It is a campus of nine squares scattered across the site, sometimes touching, sometimes intersecting, and at times standing all alone. But that’s not entirely true either. From the exterior these arrangements are illegible. All the corners look the same, there is no difference between the varying levels of intimacy. It’s an ambiguous elevation. The elevation is all about graphic flatness. All components are projected from a flat plane, without regard to the geometry of the campus. Resulting in skewed patterns, mismatched edges, and oddly proportioned windows.Edges between colors land everywhere but the actual corner, masking seams and creating new ones, suggesting alternative geometries. The façade, too, is filled with lies. It depicts three colors: red, green, blue. These colors are not pure. They’re a mix of subtractive colors: cyan, magenta, yellow. When these colors are placed adjacent to each other, one as figure the other as ground, they act as a bitmap creating red, green, and blue. Even program struggles to tell the project’s story. An even distribution of the three programs, gallery, office, and residential, would yield three boxes per program. Instead programs bleed out of their box, infiltrate other boxes, take up only half a box, or fight for their own. There is no restraint. Misagreements is about misreading, misregistering, and misinterpreting. It is an imposter, it wears a set of disguises masking itself from proper understanding.
Front Elevation
PLAN APLAN A
PLAN BPLAN B
PLAN CPLAN C
PLAN DPLAN D
SECTION 01SECTION 01
SECTION 02SECTION 02
SECTION 03SECTION 03
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FIRMNESS, COMMODITY, & DELIGHT
In collaboration with Joanna Grant

Firmitas, Utilitas, Venustas. Firmness, Commodity, Delight. Infamous words written by Vitruvius regarding the essential elements of architecture. There is a clear hierarchy to these three elements, priority is given to firmness, then commodity, with delight mentioned last. What would happen if we were to flip the order? What happens when delight is given priority?

The Latin translation of venustas defines delight as beauty in relation to architecture, only beautiful when its appearance is pleasing and in good taste, and as long as it follows the correct principles of proportion and symmetry.

However, the 13th century French translation of delight (delit) is “pleasure, delight, sexual desire.” This translation i s more accurate to today’s understanding of delight, which implies an aesthetically desirable object of secretive indulgence.

In foregrounding “delight” we would like to loosely establish an aesthetic category without a predefined formal tendency, rule set, or proportion. Through bringing together a group of people whose work might be considered flagrantly formal, insincere, frivolous, and maybe even silly, we would like to explore the potentials of delight as a point of origin.

We are serious about not being serious.

Guests: Laurel Broughton (Welcome Projects); Mark Foster Gage (Mark Foster Gage + Associates); Andrew Kovacs (Archive of Affinities), Jimenez Lai (Bureau Spectacular); Michael Loverich (Bittertang).

& Delight on Vimeo
& Delight Poster
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MIRROR/MIRROR: AN ALIEN NOVELTY

In collaboration with Shujie Chen and Tyler Kvochick

Alien Novelty is an architectural film that explores the potential of symmetry as a generator of archetypal spaces. Whereas symmetry is typically understood as an underlying organizational device, this film uses novelty as the organizer of symmetry. Here, symmetry creates disorder.

Unlike other contemporary forms of architectural imagery such as the collage and the render, which create spatial differences and construct new environments through an assemblage of images referenced from disparate sources, Alien Novelty attempts to transform the native architectural information into something alien.

Vaguely familiar elevations collide with distorted interiors, estranged furniture, and kaleidoscopic ceilings in this dream-like sequence through Frank Gehry’s Lewis Library, creating an irresolvable architecture.

// Published, Issue 01, POOL.

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GHOSTS N STUFF
In collaboration with Andrew Percival

The mystery of concealment; these ghosts play with our imagination. A formal ambiguity allows for multiple readings of each object. The human psychological phenomena of pareidolia encourages a projected persona to be assigned to each intimate object where one did not previously exist. Similar to the act of cloud watching, as one gazes upon these ghosts: figures, shapes, and patterns begin to emerge.

There is a tension between the interior and exterior of the ghosts. Assumptions of solidity based on visual similarities with Baroque sculpture and materiality are incorrect. These ghosts do no imitate cloth through carefulcarving, instead they are actually hardened drapery. The act of physically freezing cloth leaves behind a voluminous interior void that sits in direct contrast to the apparent solidity of the exterior.

GHOSTS N STUFF
GHOSTS N STUFF GHOSTS N STUFF GHOSTS N STUFF GHOSTS N STUFF GHOSTS N STUFF GHOSTS N STUFF GHOSTS N STUFF GHOSTS N STUFF
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LET'S PLAY HOUSE

These speculative houses explore the architectural effects of lifestyle, altering the plan based on the inhabitant. Rather than a cinematic production, similar to the mail order houses of the early 20th century, these houses are more comparable to reality TV: dancing between a fantastical world and a softened reality.

// Published, Issue 14: All Visual, The Economy Magazine.

Let's Play HouseCOLLECTOR

You’re not a hoarder, you’re just a messy collector. No one understands, you do know exactly where everything is. Just because they can’t see the organization doesn’t mean it’s not there. You’re not only collecting; you’re curating, exhibiting, and inhabiting your collection. Let your collection become your home.

Let's Play HouseGIANT

Join the small apartment and tiny house craze! This regular sized house is tiny for any real giant. Sure, there are a few compromises, but you can’t beat the price or the location. This pleasant house boasts a cute, yet fun, kitchenette and dining nook. The master bedroom provides for a sensual and intimate setting. Your child will have just enough space to do their homework. The bathroom is fairly roomy as well, although there is a bit of a knee-bump when you first sit down.Maybe we should have gone with less conventional furniture… good thing there’s a storage room in the backyard.

Let's Play HouseHALFLING

This little workers cottage feels more like a mansion. It isn’t the house, it’s you! Being smaller has its perks. With all this extra space, who knows what you’ll do. Let’s just hope you’re not friends with any giants, they might not be as ecstatic about your new home.

Let's Play HousePROCURER

This five bedroom house provides the best bang for your buck. Come in and take a load off, we recommend the second to last door on the left.

Let's Play HouseDIVORCED COUPLE

Do you love your kids, but hate your wife? Then this is the house for you!This double lot house is a row house where everyone gets their own home. The parents each live in one of the end houses, while the children live in a thickened party wall. The children each get their own room, a giant play space, and a slide! You get your own place, she gets hers, and you both get to see the kids all the time. You can barely feel the tension!

Let's Play HouseMOUSE

This quaint home, reminiscent of load bearing cathedral walls, boasts a tiny apartment complex for mice. Each mouse apartment ranges from 2 square feet, to 3.5 square feet, perfect for a small studio, a wonderful one bedroom, or a family-sized two bedroom. The home provides fantastic return on your investment, as the income generated from the mice will quickly pay off the house, that is, if you can handle the noise… skritch skritch skritch.

Let's Play HouseEXPLORER

With this familiar-looking worker’s cottage façade, you can live in the great outdoors while conforming to the rules of the neighborhood association. Comes fully loaded with tent, fire pit, bear bag, outhouse, and bathing pond!

Let's Play HouseTWINSEveryone may think you’re exactly the same, but we know you’re different. Much different than most developer housing, we’ve made subtle changes to the interiors, rather than simply copying and pasting.
Let's Play HouseGHOST

Looking for a house to entertain your still-living friends? This sleek worker’s cottage provides just that. The house is organized as a large open corridor, housing all of your entertaining needs. While your private rooms lay just beyond the walls of the hallway. Entry to these rooms is simple; just walk through the walls. Remember: you don’t need doors, you’re a ghost! This way you can keep your still-living friends in the living room, and out of your private sanctuary. Solitude always guaranteed.

Let's Play HouseWORKAHOLIC

Looking to be exceptional at what you love? Move your office into your home! With a shorter commute time you can be 1000 times more efficient!Our simple conversion will transform your dining room into a conference room, and your living room will become the main workspace. Talk about a home office! The only problem is finding a place to rest... That’s okay, we’ll throw a bed into the kitchen; you don’t sleep anyways.

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FLIPPING PROPERTIES
In collaboration with BUREAU SPECTACULAR/Jimenez Lai

As a continuation in Bureau Spectacular's ongoing study of super-furnitures, Flipping Properties takes the familiar house icon (pentagon) and denatures it. The 45 degree diagonal cuts produces an unevenness between parts, but also allows for the oblique projection to become physical reality. Moreover, the five-sided piece is meant to tumble, as the reoriented pentagon attains different readings from its new relationships with the ground.

// Exhibited at Rear View (Projects) Toronto, Canada. Curated by Jennifer Davis & Su-Ying Lee.

FLIPPING PROPERTIES FLIPPING PROPERTIES FLIPPING PROPERTIES FLIPPING PROPERTIES FLIPPING PROPERTIES FLIPPING PROPERTIES
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PLANES OF MISFITS
In collaboration with BUREAU SPECTACULAR/Jimenez Lai

Mathematics is the language of nature. By applying a grid – a mathematical structure – to nature, we translate context into objective environments with measurable properties such as dimensions, textures, and colors. The grid, nowhere more visible than Chicago, transforms nature into neutral, indisputable, and absolute facts. In contrast, willfulness is the agent of ambition that allows architects to tamper with nature. Willfulness is the courage to be irreverent to the grid, to transform facts into fictions, and to disturb absolutism with ill-advised logic. To be willful is to be human, and we must accept the artificial, subjective tendencies that render architecture decidedly man-made.

// Exhibited at The Art Institute of Chicago as part of Chicagoisms, curated by Alexander Eisenschmidt & Jonathan Mekinda.

PLANES OF MISFITS PLANES OF MISFITS PLANES OF MISFITS PLANES OF MISFITS PLANES OF MISFITS
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TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWAN
In collaboration with BUREAU SPECTACULAR/Jimenez Lai

The Township of Domestic Parts: Made in Taiwan is a collection of nine small houses, each with one single program. Scattered inside the Palazzo delle Prigioni, it forms an interior township of misfit parts. Each house embodies one domestic program, such as the House of Sleep, or the House of Social Eating. While this pavilion is fully functional as a guesthouse for international visitors, it also works through three thoughts in the discipline of architecture: domestic programmes as characters, private inverted public, and interior as township.

// Taiwan Pavilion at the 14th International Venice Biennale.

TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWAN
TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWANPHOTO: IWAN BAAN
TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWANPHOTO: IWAN BAAN
TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWANPHOTO: IWAN BAAN
TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWANPHOTO: IWAN BAAN
TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWANPHOTO: IWAN BAAN
TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWANPHOTO: IWAN BAAN
TOWNSHIP OF DOMESTIC PARTS: MADE IN TAIWANPHOTO: IWAN BAAN
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GAME ON! v2.0
In collaboration with Meghan Funk

Game On! is a supergraphic playground that promotes play and exercise. While the initial proposal for Game On! used the flattening of playground games as representation, with color and pattern as infill. The final design focused on the abstraction of playground games and exercises for playfulness, graphic identity, and ease of application; using familiar geometries and patterns to represent activities. For instance, back and forth sprint training is abstracted into the Mountain Run, where the user sprints up and down the mountain. Similarly the Hop To It game distills the playground games of lilypad and follow the leader into a graphic field of shapes and lines. In order to provide clarity, each activity is partnered with an instructional tag that describes rules for games, and indicates proper form for exercises.

Game On! was installed for under $1,000 in 3 days.

// First Place, Activate! Public Space Design Competition.

// Best Event, Friends of Downtown.

GAME ON! v1.0
GAME ON! v2.0 GAME ON! v2.0 GAME ON! v2.0 GAME ON! v2.0 GAME ON! v2.0 GAME ON! v2.0
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NINE LITTLE WORLDS

Architecture and landscapes have the power to displace natural geography by manufacturing place. Even when imitating local conditions, architecture and landscapes are simply fabricated realities. Nine Little Worlds is exactly that; Nine Little Worlds is a park about fantasy experiences and made up places.

Nine Little Worlds is a hallucinogenic mirage of other places and experiences. These worlds are so real that they feel completely authentic. Through the use of visual mimicry, alteration of pattern, and environmental additives, Nine Little Worlds generates nine new sensory environments that ignore local conditions for the park goer to explore. From a field that blooms at night, to a forest that generates its own heat, to a quilted field, each world is an autonomous condition with its own fantasy experience.

Nine Little Worlds takes control over nature and distills it into a field of points. The airport’s by-products are then added into the system and act as influence points to either attract or detract the field. Nine Little Worlds situates itself along the perimeter of O’Hare International Airport, drawing resources such as rain water, glycol runoff, and heat, while attempting to mitigate the various pollutions of the airport.

// Benn-Johnck Award, AIA Chicago.

// Selected for Exhibition, Year End Show, UIC School of Architecture.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS SITE PLAN
NINE LITTLE WORLDS

Nightbloom/Sound Garden/Forever Fall, Tree Grid/Figural Forest/Yellow Blanket, Rain Forest/Fever Grove/Green Machine

NINE LITTLE WORLDS ZOOM

Nightbloom/Green Machine [A+I]

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[A] Night Bloom

Night is when the flowers come out. Night Bloom uses grow lights to cast a purple hue on a field of wild flowers, coming to life in the middle of the night. These lights act to change the homogenous texture of the landscape, by attracting thicker and fuller overgrowth near the base of the lights.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[B] Sound Garden

What’s that sound? Not airplanes. The sound garden is a quiet world, which uses white noise emitters to cancel the obnoxious sound of the planes arriving and departing from O’Hare.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[C] Forever Fall

Forever Fall is a forest caught in the beautiful colors of autumn. It attributes its color to glycol, a deicing and anti-freeze fluid used at the airport. The fluid typically runs off planes and collects in reservoirs where it is then emptied into the municipal watersystem. This forest collects glycol runoff from O’Hare’s reservoirs, cleans it, and puts it on display as it waits to be reused.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[D] Tree Grid

The Tree Grid is a surreal world where natural elements are defined by an orthogonal grid. It’s a natural forest with an unnatural organization.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[E] Figural Forest

This world ignores typical shapes, and trees spring up in all shapes and sizes. The geometric shapes of the trees mimic the sculpture walk that runs through this world.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[F] Yellow Blanket

This world is a giant quilt, boasting patchwork of various yellow plants. This surreal landscape is created through the artificial patterning of natural elements.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[G] Rain Forest

Rain forests are no longer stuck in the tropics. This world takes indigenous trees and just adds water. The rain forest takes water runoff from the airport, cleans it, and uses it to transform this maple forest into a rainforest; filled with lakes, rivers, rain, and mist.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[H] Fever Grove

Looking to camp in the middle of winter? No problem, it’s always warm at Fever Grove. This worldc onducts heat from O’Hare and the adjacent Metra line and repurposes it as artificial heating elements. Creating warm fields, campgrounds, and bon fires to be enjoyed year around.

NINE LITTLE WORLDS

[I] Green Machine

The Green Machine is an ecological machine, disguised as a bamboo field, cultivating algae to reduce pollution. This surreal environment is a field of vertical algae bio-reactors, converting hazardous amounts of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide into oxygen and biomass. This world works while you play.

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LEARNING FROM THE DELLS
Learning from The Dells: A Field Guide to Creating a Tourist Hub is a tool kit for designers, city planners, and urbanists to ensure the longevity of the city. It is a new way to think about cities, Learning from The Dells redefines the city as a playground. The guide contains a series of ingredients, tips, and rules for mining the potential recreation and leisure factor of a city. These rules are extracted and abstracted from the historical process of the Wisconsin Dells.

// Undergraduate Sustainability Award, UIC Research Forum

NINE LITTLE WORLDS ZOOM
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GAME ON! v1.0
In collaboration with Meghan Funk

Game On! interprets the semi-pedestrian intersection of Drexel Avenue and 62nd Street as a potential field of interactions, deploying super graphics that encourage the re-occupation of the street as a space of public living. The intersection is understood as five zones, each with a different mix of familiar school yard games and new fields open for interpretation. The jogging tracks demarcate the territory of the overall site, while the extreme/cross country/off-road track works to mine conditions of the site to create a more challenging experience. Games with more definite dimensions are positioned within this territory, while the other spaces are filled with suggestive patterning for free play.

The precise yet loose graphics mean that the Game On! strategy could be deployed on other sites. Beside the rough dimensional requirements governing the size of each game, the arrangement of play areas is flexible and able to adapt to the needs of the context. At Drexel and 62nd, the new field reaches towards the school and the community workshop, working to bridge these established active areas to create a corridor of creative speculation and social interaction.

// First Place, Activate! Public Space Design Competition.

GAME ON! v1.0
GAME ON! v1.0
GAME ON! v1.0
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WRONG TRANSFER

The shopping mall is an idealized impersonation of the city. The Wrong Transfer is not. The Wrong Transfer is a new shopping experience. It does not root itself in tradition by mimicking familiar urban phenomena to entice customers, like the Gruen or Jerde transfers, but rather it stems from a different familiarity: consumerism.

The Wrong Transfer takes place at Block 37, a shopping mall adjacent to Chicago’s famed shopping street, State Street. The Wrong Transfer takes note of its precedent, and retains its original geometries as it collapses all of its stories to produce a homogeneous single story shopping field. The original geometries are retained as an underlying framework, which subdivides the shopping surface into a field of irregular lots.

The wrong transfer is a store, shopping mall, and market all at the same time. changing names according to context, scale, and projection. While it may have several aliases, the Wrong Transfer is simply a consumer environment.

// Selected for Exhibition, Year End Show, UIC School of Architecture.

// Finalist, UIC Exhibition “Cropped”

WRONG TRANSFER: WRONG STORE

WRONG STORE

Shopping centers are being built according to models of real streets, enhanced by references to people’s imagination. They produce artificial, but reliable and believable city experiences modeled after stereotypes of real locations. They are designed to appeal, to charm, and to make people buy. The Wrong Transfer does not play games to seduce consumerism; it is honest in its purpose. The wrong transfer is a sea of merchandise, given to the modern flâneur to explore and consume.

WRONG TRANSFER: WRONG MALL

WRONG MALL

The Wrong Transfer is an anchor store within the urban environment. Today there is little distinction between the urban experience and the shopping experience. Shopping is not only a basic routine of urban life, it is a means to experience it. You can enjoy the city if you can shop in it; the city is a shopping mall. Through the use of the Nolli Plan, Chicago’s loop is reinterpreted as a shopping mall. Areas that do not allow the urban tourist to experience the city are transformed into poche; as a result the “Mall of Chicago” appears in white, with the Wrong Transfer as one of its anchors.

WRONG TRANSFER: WRONG MARKET

WRONG MARKET

The Wrong Market is a subdivided field of irregular lots that can be rented out to retailers as small advertisements, medium scale showrooms, or full scale stores. This creates a game for potential tenants. No longer are they allowed to deploy their “plug-in and play” store layouts. Rather, they must invent and design new ways of deploying their product into the market. These rentable lots break the systematic field of merchandise and begin to act as focal points in one’s drift. It’s like window shopping internalized. These lots run the task of turning in a passer-by into an eager consumer.

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